Lucinda Johnson

Center for Water
and the Environment
NRRI  >  CWE  >  Lucinda Johnson 

Lucinda Johnson, Ph.D., CWE Center Director and Senior Research Associate

Lucinda Johnson

Position and Focus

Areas of interest include bioindicators, amphibians and watersheds. Research projects include: effects of multiple stressors on aquatic communities; testing indicators of coastal ecosystem integrity using fish and macroinvertebrates; protocols for selecting classification systems and reference conditions: a comparison of methods.


Background

Ph.D., Zoology, Michigan State University, 1999
M.S., Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, 1984
B.A., Duke University, 1976


Current Publications

  • Herb, William R, Johnson, Lucinda B Jacobson, Peter C & Stefan, Heinz G. 2014. Projecting coldwater fish habitat in lakes of the glacial lakes region under changing land use and climate regimes.
  • Johnson, Lucinda. 2014. Lake Superior North Shore Brook Trout - How Will They Respond to Climate Change?. Lake Superior Angler 21--25.
  • Kovalenko, Katya E., Brady, V J, Ciborowski, Jan J H Ilyushkin, S & Johnson, Lucinda B. 2014. Functional changes in littoral macroinvertebrate communities in response to watershed-level anthropogenic stress. PLOS ONE
  • Peterson, Anna C Niemi, Gerald J & Johnson, Douglas H. 2014. Patterns in diurnal airspace use by migratory landbirds along an ecological barrier. Ecological Applications In press
  • Jicha, T. M., Johnson, L. B., Hill, B. H., Regal, R. R. Elonen, C. M. & Pearson, M. S.. 2013. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF NITRIFICATION RATES IN FORESTED FLOODPLAIN WETLAND SOILS OF UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER POOL 8. River Research and Applications (May)
  • Click here to view complete publication list.


    Project list for Lucinda Johnson :


    (A link will go to the project's current report, an arrow will take you to a project's home page)

    Collaborative Research: Climatic and Anthropogenic Forcing of Wetland Landscape Connectivity in the Great Plains
    This collaborative project brings together hydrological modelers, ecologists, and spatial scientists from five universities to establish links among climatic and land use drivers affecting habitat connectivity for wildlife in current and projected wetland landscapes. Building on a theoretical framework of well-established landscape ecological principles regarding effects of land cover and connectivity, this work will examine patterns and processes that interact across local to continental scales and incorporate Land Cover/Land Use Change (LCLUC) projections in predicting habitat suitability and landscape connectivity for wetland-dependent species. The objective of the overall project is to assess the influence of climatic drivers of wetland landscape habitat connectivity in the Great Plains, incorporating sophisticated hydrologic modeling with projected climate change and LCLUC to predict impacts on amphibians and waterbirds under a range of likely future scenarios. Landscape ecologists at NRRI will be working on the amphibian modeling portion of this project, with the sub-objective to model the effects of climate and land use/land cover change on wetland habitat availability and connectivity at local and landscape scales using amphibians (anurans and salamanders) as a focal group with low vagility.

    Managing the Nations Fish Habitat at Multiple Spatial Scales
    1) To refine empirical and mechanistic models for predicting extent of cold water fish habitat under current land use and climate regimes. Predict oxythermal habitat for coldwater fish species using an empirical model incorporating existing land use, lake morphometry, and climate data. 2) Predict future extents of cold water fish habitat in lakes of the Glacial Lakes region under future climate and land use scenarios. Predict future oxythermal habitat in lakes under changing land use and climate for a large set of regional coldwater lakes using empirical models. Predict future oxythermal habitat for individual lakes under changing land use and climate for distinct lake classes and/or geographic regions using a mechanistic model.

    Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring
    To assess the biotic condition of all the major coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes, United States and Canadian shorelines.

    A Comprehensive Stressor-Response Model to Inform Ecosystem Restorations Across the Great Lakes Basin
    Two maps depicting anthropogenic stresses across the Great Lakes Basin will be merged into a composite map that spans the entire basin.

    Improving Hydrology Predictions with LiDAR
    Use newly available soils and topographic data to update predictions of peak and base flow in MN`s north shore streams.